Someone sold an iPhone 11 Pro with an off-centered Apple logo for $2700

Apple’s quality control process is on point 99% of the time. The company pays close attention to making sure all of its products are of top-notch condition. However, as rare – we are talking 1 in 100 million here – as a mistake from Apple can be, it still happens.

New images that have surfaced on Twitter this week show an iPhone 11 Pro with a misaligned Apple logo. What’s crazier is that the device recently sold for a whopping $2,700. The report just goes to show how much consumers are willing to pay for a rare Apple product.

Someone sold an iPhone 11 Pro with an off-centred Apple logo for $2700

Images of an iPhone 11 Pro model with a misaligned Apple logo surface online

The Internal Archive account claims that this misprinted Midnight-Green iPhone 11 Pro could be as rare as 1 in 100 million, or “possible even rarer.” The account frequently posts images of are Apple prototypes and accessories.

In the shared images, we get a closer look at the misaligned Apple logo. At first glance, it is very obvious that the position of the logo does not match the centrally aligned official logo that can be found on the back of every iPhone on the market. The logo is off-center and leans noticeably to the right. The angle of the logo is also tilted slightly to the left.

https://twitter.com/ArchiveInternal/status/1380511781131550722?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw%7Ctwcamp%5Etweetembed%7Ctwterm%5E1380511781131550722%7Ctwgr%5E%7Ctwcon%5Es1_c10&ref_url=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.imore.com%2Fsomeone-paid-2700-iphone-11-pro-wonky-apple-logo

Unfortunately, the tweet does not offer additional details regarding the device. We can assume that the iPhone 11 Pro most likely faced a manufacturing error that caused the logo on the rear end of the device to be misaligned. Note that the existence of this device is alleged.

If this is an official Apple device, it is bizarre that it managed to pass all quality control checks and managed to make its way into the market. Usually, devices that are not up to the mark in terms of quality are destroyed during the manufacturing process to ensure they do not reach consumers.

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About the Author

Asma is an editor at iThinkDifferent with a strong focus on social media, Apple news, streaming services, guides, mobile gaming, app reviews, and more. When not blogging, Asma loves to play with her cat, draw, and binge on Netflix shows.

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